st paul's bay promenade

During the period between April and June 2023, the Planning Authority approved 494 permits that will see the addition of 2,453 units to Malta’s housing stock, according to the National Statistics Office.

This represents an increase of 9.5 per cent when compared to the number of new dwellings approved in the second quarter of 2022.

The average number of approved new dwellings per building permit stood at five.

The majority of new dwellings approved during the second quarter of 2023 were apartments (1,740), followed by penthouses (386), maisonettes (222), terraced houses (81) and other residential units1 (24).

Apartments accounted for 70.9 per cent of the total number of approved new dwellings.

Compared to the corresponding quarter of 2022, the number of new dwellings approved in Malta increased by 18.7 per cent.

However, new housing units approved in Gozo decreased by 24.6 per cent.

The highest number of approved new dwellings was registered in the Northern Harbour district (642) while the lowest number was recorded in the Western district (152).

When looking at the approval of new dwellings by locality, the highest number were issued in St Paul’s Bay (224) – already Malta’s most populous town.

It was followed by Mosta (163), Qormi (107), Mellieħa (103) and Msida (101).

Featured Image:

St Paul’s Bay / Mario Galea / Viewing Malta

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